Neurodermatitis

Neurodermatitis:
The right skin care is part of the basic therapy for neurodermatitis – it is also necessary in times of no complaints. For the treatment of acute attacks, various additional medications are used.

What helps against neurodermatitis?
Neurodermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that occurs in attacks of varying severity and duration. Currently there is no treatment that could cure neurodermatitis. However, there are therapeutic options available that can significantly improve the condition of the skin and help to ensure that the symptom-free phases last longer.
Basically, a distinction must be made between two forms of treatment for neurodermatitis:
* Basic therapy: This plays a central role in neurodermatitis and is important in every phase of the disease – even when the skin appears “healthy”. It aims to prevent new attacks of the disease or to counteract the worsening of existing symptoms.
* Treatment of acute flare-ups: Active ingredients are used to alleviate the inflammation in the skin and thus improve the symptoms. Cortisone ointments are most frequently used.

Basic therapy for neurodermatitis
The so-called basic therapy is a cornerstone of neurodermatitis treatment. It is important that it also takes place in phases without symptoms. This is because it makes a significant contribution to avoiding new attacks of the disease and to the general improvement of the skin condition. The basic therapy includes the following measures:

Remedies against neurodermatitis
There are various drugs for the treatment of acute neurodermatitis attacks in adults. As a rule, cortisone ointments are recommended and are considered to be the first choice. They have an anti-inflammatory effect and can thus alleviate the skin symptoms in acute attacks. In certain cases, however, other active ingredients may also be considered.
In principle, the following drugs can be used for the treatment of neurodermatitis:

* Cortisone ointments:

They have an anti-inflammatory effect and are usually applied to the affected skin areas once a day until the eczema has healed. Then the cortisone ointment is removed. This means that a lower concentrated ointment is applied or the intervals between treatments are extended. In sensitive areas such as the face, neck, body folds, genital area or the scalp of babies, cortisone ointments should not be applied or should only be applied for a few days.

Would you have known?
By early adulthood, the symptoms will disappear in about 60 percent of those affected.1 The chances of the disease “growing out”, so to speak, are therefore not so bad.

The term neurodermatitis means as much as nerve inflammation and is actually outdated. Today we know that the skin symptoms have nothing to do with inflammation of the nerves. The medically correct term for the disease is: atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema.

Neurodermatitis is not an allergy. But a large proportion of those affected have an increased tendency to allergies (e.g. hay fever, asthma) and certain allergens can trigger a relapse or aggravate the skin symptoms.

Neurodermatitis is not contagious.

The often agonizing itching and the visible skin symptoms can severely impair the quality of life.

Today, about 10 to 15 percent of children develop neurodermatitis by the time they start school – that is four or six times as many as in the 1950s and 1960s.1

Skin cracks in the corners of the mouth or on the earlobes are considered to be the so-called “minimal variants” of neurodermatitis.

Neurodermatitis often recedes in adulthood. However, at least 30 percent of all children who suffer from neurodermatitis develop eczema at least temporarily even later on.1

The skin of neurodermatitis patients becomes white when scratched (the doctor does this, for example, with a wooden spatula or pencil) – healthy skin reacts with a reddening.

By early adulthood, the symptoms disappear in about 60 percent of those affected.1 The chances of the disease “growing out”, so to speak, are therefore not so bad.

The term neurodermatitis means as much as nerve inflammation and is actually outdated. Today we know that the skin symptoms have nothing to do with inflammation of the nerves. The medically correct term for the disease is: atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema.